The Langley Schools Music Project’s Venus and Mars Rock Show

This is the official blog for The Langley Schools Music Project’s Venus and Mars Rock Show. Here you’ll find all the latest news and updates about the show, as well as behind-the-scenes looks at the making of the show.

Introduction

Langley Schools Music Project’s “Venus and Mars Rock Show” is a re-recording of Paul McCartney and Wings’ album “Venus and Mars.” The album was recorded by children in grades 3-6 from Langley Fundamental Elementary School in British Columbia, Canada, under the direction of music teacher Rheal Lanthier.

The project began in 1976 when Lanthier was given a copy of “Venus and Mars” by a friend. He was impressed by the album and thought it would be a good choice for his students to re-record. He selected eight songs from the album – “Venus and Mars,” “Rock Show,” “Jet,” “Let Me Roll It,” “Spirits of Ancient Egypt,” “Medicine Jar,” “Call Me Back Home,” and “Listen to What the Man Said” – and had his students learn them. The students then recorded the songs in their school gymnasium over the course of two days in November 1976.

The Langley Schools Music Project

The Langley Schools Music Project is a Canadian educational project initiated in the 1970s. It was conceived and directed by BC music teacher Hans Fenger. Between 1976 and 1978, children from Langley, British Columbia recorded an album of popular songs from the 1970s. The album was called Innocence & Experience.

The Langley Schools Music Project’s version of Paul McCartney and Wings’ “Venus and Mars Rock Show” is one of the most famous recordings to come out of the project. The song was recorded by children aged 9-12, with no prior experience playing or singing. Despite this, their version of the song is incredibly catchy and considered by many to be better than the original.

The Langley Schools Music Project’s “Venus and Mars Rock Show” has been featured in numerous films and tv shows, including Sofia Coppola’s Oscar-winning film Lost in Translation.

The Project’s Background

In the early 1970s, a Canadian teacher named Hans Fenger created a new way of teaching music in schools. His approach was based on the belief that anyone can create music, regardless of ability or experience.

Fenger’s method quickly gained popularity, and by 1976 he had founded the Langley Schools Music Project. The project involved recording children singing popular songs from the 1970s. These recordings were then distributed to schools around the world.

The project’s first album, “In Tune”, was released in 1977 and featured children singing songs like “Venus and Mars” by Paul McCartney and ” Sunglasses” by Dick Dale. The album was a huge success, selling over a million copies.

The project’s second album, “Space Age”, was released in 1979 and featured children singing songs like “Rocket Man” by Elton John and “I Believe I Can Fly” by R. Kelly.

The Langley Schools Music Project’s albums have been praised for their beauty and simplicity. The project has been credited with introducing many young people to the joys of making music.

The Project’s Purpose

The Langley Schools Music Project was created in 1976 with the goal of teaching children about music and giving them a chance to experience performing. The project’s founder, Barry Sheers, believed that music could be a powerful tool for education and personal development.

The project’s flagship program is the Venus and Mars Rock Show, a performance featuring children singing and playing popular songs from the 1970s. The show is designed to teach kids about different styles of music, history, and culture. The Langley Schools Music Project has also released several albums of children’s music, including covers of popular songs by artists like David Bowie and the Beach Boys.

The Project’s Methods

The Langley Schools Music Project’s Venus and Mars Rock Show is a 1976 album of children’s music, conceived and directed by Canadian musician Denny Hall. The songs on the album are all cover versions of popular rock hits of the time, performed by a children’s choir aged 9–11, with minimal adult supervision or intervention. The project was recorded in two local schools in Langley, British Columbia, over the course of a school year.

The methods used to produce the album were controversial at the time. Hall instructed the children in how to play their parts using rote learning rather than sheet music; he also encouraged them to ad-lib their vocals, giving rise to occasional errors in pitch and tempo. Nevertheless, the album was widely praised for its innocence and charm, and has since been cited as an influence by a number of well-known musicians.

The Project’s Results

The Langley Schools Music Project’s album “Venus and Mars Rock Show” was released in 1976 to critical acclaim. The project was the brainchild of Canadian educator Doreen O’Connor and her husband, composer Carl Orff. The album featured children from the Langley School District in British Columbia, Canada, singing songs by artists like Paul McCartney, David Bowie, and Led Zeppelin.

The album was recorded over the course of six months, and the children were between the ages of six and thirteen. The album received widespread attention, and is now considered a classic.

The Project’s Significance

The Langley Schools Music Project’s Venus and Mars Rock Show is a historic album in many ways. First and foremost, it is a time capsule of an era – the mid-1970s – when space exploration was at its peak and interest in all things related to space was running high. The album was recorded by a group of elementary school children from Langley, British Columbia, at a time when most music education programs in North America were focused on classical music. The fact that these kids were playing and singing popular songs by artists like Paul McCartney, David Bowie, and Queen – and doing so with such joy and enthusiasm – was truly groundbreaking.

The album is also significant for its influence on later generations of musicians. Many of today’s top indie rock bands cite the Langley Schools Music Project as an inspiration, and the album has been praised by everyone from Pitchfork to Rolling Stone. In 2009, the Venus and Mars Rock Show was inducted into the Canadian Music Hall of Fame, cementing its place in musical history.

The Project’s Legacy

Completed in 1976, the Langley Schools Music Project was a Canadian initiative that saw elementary school children from Langley, British Columbia recording re-worked versions of popular songs from the 1970s.

The project’s most famous recordings were their takes on Paul McCartney and Wings’ “Venus and Mars” and “Rock Show”, which were both released as part of the project’s 1976 album “Innocent Hearts”.

While the project was short-lived, lasting only a couple of years, it left behind a legacy of charming and whimsical recordings that have been beloved by music fans for decades.

The Project’s Influence

Since its inception in 1976, the Langley Schools Music Project has had a profound influence on popular music. The project was started by Derryck Harrington and Kate Stevens, two teachers at Langley Fundamental Secondary School in Vancouver, British Columbia. Inspired by the work of American composer Carl Orff, Harrington and Stevens set out to create a musical curriculum that would be accessible to all students, regardless of their previous experience or skill level.

The project quickly gained notoriety for its unusual approach to music education. Rather than teaching traditional notation or technique, the Langley Schools Music Project focused on allowing students to express themselves creatively through song. This approach was radical at the time, and it soon attracted the attention of some of the biggest names in the music industry.

The most famous example of the project’s influence is Paul McCartney’s 1975 single “Venus and Mars.” McCartney was so impressed by the students’ performance of “Good Vibrations” that he asked them to record a new version of “Venus and Mars” with him. The resulting track became one of the biggest hits of McCartney’s career, and it helped to solidify the Langley Schools Music Project’s reputation as a leading force in popular music.

The Project’s Future

The Langley Schools Music Project’s future is looking bright. The project has been recreated and is now being run by a new generation of students. The new students are excited to continue the project and keep the music alive.

Keyword: The Langley Schools Music Project’s Venus and Mars Rock Show

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