Do NFL Players Get Ejected for Targeting?

Do NFL players get ejected for targeting? It’s a question that has been asked a lot lately, and unfortunately, there is no easy answer. In this blog post, we’ll take a look at the targeting rule in the NFL, and try to make sense of when players are and are not ejected for it.

Do NFL Players Get Ejected for Targeting?

Introduction

In recent years, the National Football League (NFL) has implemented a series of rule changes designed to make the game safer, including the introduction of a “targeting” rule. This rule penalizes players for hits that are deemed to be particularly dangerous or egregious, and can result in an automatic ejection from the game.

So, do NFL players get ejected for targeting? The answer is yes, they can be ejected if the officials deem that their hit meets the criteria for targeting. However, it should be noted that not all hits that are flagged for targeting will result in an ejection; this is ultimately up to the discretion of the officials.

There have been a number of high-profile ejections for targeting in recent years, including several players who were ejected during the 2020 playoffs. While some have criticized the rule as being too punitive, others believe that it is necessary in order to protect players from serious injury.

What is Targeting?

Targeting is defined as “taking aim at an opponent for the purposes of inflicting injury.” In the NFL, it is a foul that results in an automatic ejection from the game.

The rule was enacted in 2013 in an effort to make the game safer, specifically to protect defenseless players from being hit in the head or neck area. Since its inception, there have been a number of controversial calls, including some that have been overturned upon review.

Whether or not a player should be ejected for targeting is a matter of opinion, but there is no question that it has had a major impact on the game.

NFL Rule on Targeting

In the National Football League (NFL), a new rule has been put into place regarding “targeting.” This rule is defined as when a defensive player hits a defenseless receiver in the head or neck area. If a player is determined to have committed targeting, he will be automatically ejected from the game.

The intent of the rule is to protect players from dangerous and potentially career-ending injuries. However, some argue that the rule is too harsh and that it takes away from the physical nature of the game.

What do you think? Should players be automatically ejected for targeting?

Ejection Process

The NFL’s Rule 12, Section 2, Article 8 states that “ungentlemanly conduct” includes “but is not limited to… using abusive, threatening, or insulting language or gestures to opponents, teammates, officials, or representatives of the League.” So if a player uses language or gestures that are considered abusive, threatening, or insulting, he can be ejected from the game.

Targeting is defined as “taking aim at an opponent for the purpose of inflicting an injury.” If a player targets an opponent with the intent to injure him, he can be ejected from the game.

Examples of Ejections for Targeting

In 2017, there were six players ejected for targeting. This is the first year that the NFL instituted a rule changes that allowed for players to be automatically ejected if they were called for targeting. The rule change was made in an effort to increase player safety.

The following are examples of plays that resulted in an ejection for targeting:
-In week one, Green Bay Packers’ safety Jermaine Whitehead was ejected for a hit on Dallas Cowboys’ returner Ryan Switzer.
-In week two, Los Angeles Chargers’ cornerback Casey Hayward was ejected for a hit on Buffalo Bills’ wide receiver Zay Jones.
-In week three, New York Giants’ linebacker B.J. Goodson was ejected for a hit on Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ wide receiver Chris Godwin.
-In week seven, Indianapolis Colts’ safety Matthias Farley was ejected for a hit on Oakland Raiders’ running back Jalen Richard.
-In week ten, New Orleans Saints’ cornerback Marshon Lattimore was ejected for a hit on Tampa Bay Buccaneers’ wide receiver DeSean Jackson.
-In week thirteen, Cleveland Browns’ linebacker Joe Schobert was ejected for a hit on Green Bay Packers’ wide receiver Davante Adams.

Conclusion

In conclusion, NFL players can be ejected for targeting if they are flagged for it by the officials. However, if the officials don’t flag the player for targeting, then he will not be ejected from the game.

Keyword: Do NFL Players Get Ejected for Targeting?

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